Copy of Skincare Glossary english


Melasma, Age Spots, Dark Spots or Acne Spots; don't worry, we take it away.

Melasma is a common skin problem among the Latinas and is sometimes referred to as chloasma, pano, máscara del embarazo or manchas, depending on the region. It causes brown to gray-brown patches on the face. It is most often seen on the cheeks, nose, forehead, chin and above the upper lip. Melasma is believed to be caused by hormonal changes and made worse by sun exposure. Common melasma triggers include a change in hormones due to pregnancy, birth control pills and hormone replacement medicine. Sun exposure can also trigger melasma as Ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun stimulates the melanocytes causing excess pigment in the skin.

 

 

Age Spots, also referred to as Liver Spots or Sun Spots, are flat, brown-black spots that usually appear on the skin in sun-exposed areas of the body. Dermatologists commonly refer to these spots as Solar Lentigines. They have nothing to do with the liver or liver function. They look like freckles, only darker and can group together, making them more prominent. Age Spots should not be confused with melasma. Unlike melasma these spots are commonly found on both men and women and they are not related to hormones; they form due to aging, exposure to the sun or other forms of ultraviolet light. The spots may start to appear as a person reaches their late 30's or 40's depending on the amount of (UV) exposure they have experienced. Age or Liver Spots occur most often on areas that have had the greatest sun exposure, such as the backs of the hands, face, forearms, chest and shoulders.

 

 

Photo-damage or Photoaging is the structural and functional deterioration of sun-exposed skin, resulting in wrinkling, roughness, discoloration, solar lentigines and a decrease of collagen. Photoaging typically comes from many years of sun exposure. It may become noticeable earlier in life for individuals who spend excessive time in the sun without protection.

 

 

PIH – Post Inflammatory Hyperpigmentation: Individuals with darker skin types may experience hyperpigmentation when their skin is traumatized. Trauma can include scratches to the skin or  acne lesions. Hyperpigmentation due to acne lesions is referred to as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, which can result in dark spots left on the skin long after acne lesions are gone.